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1.1: Homework Chapter 1


The Scope of Chemistry (Libretext) and the Scientific Method

1. Define Chemistry

2. Which of the following is not matter?

a. A song

b. A rock

c. A piece of paper

3. Which of the following is matter?

a. Air

b. Sunlight

c. Happiness

4. Select the key term that corresponds to each of the following definitions

(a) biochemistry

(b) experiment

(c) hypothesis

(d) analytical chemistry

(f) organic chemistry

(f) scientific method

(k) theory

____ 1) A scientific procedure for gathering data and recording observations or measurements under controlled conditions.

____2) A systematic investigation that consists of making observations, formulating hypotheses, and designing experiments, which in turn lead to additional observations, hypotheses, and experiments in repeated cycles

____3) A well-established explanation of a scientific principle supported by extensive experimental data collected over time.

____4) A tentative proposal of a scientific principle that attempts to explain the meaning of a set of data collected in an experiment

____5) The study of the composition of matter (focusing on separation, identification, and quantification of chemicals in samples of matter).

____6) The study of carbon containing chemical substances.

5. Classify each statement as a law, a theory, an experiment, a hypothesis, or an observation.

  1. Pure ethanol boils at 78.5oC.
  2. In a chemical reaction the total mass of reactants is equal to the total mass of products in a closed container.
  3. Measured amounts of 10% silver nitrate solution were added to sodium chloride solution to determine the mass of silver chloride produced under carefully controlled conditions.
  4. The volume of a given amount of gas increases as the temperature increases at constant temperature and pressure.

6. Classify each statement as a law, a theory, an experiment, a hypothesis, or an observation.

  1. A yellow solid formed when a 2 mL diluted clear solution of lead nitrate reacted with a 2 mL diluted clear solution of lead iodide.
  2. Matter is composed of discreet units called atoms.
  3. The solubility of a gas is directly proportional to the pressure applied to the gas.
  4. Different patients (previously screened) were given varying doses of aspirin and their blood pressure monitored at very specific periods of time.
  5. The newly extracted metal is gray in color.

7. Do an internet search using one of the five chemistry areas as a search term. List at least two employment opportunities for experts in the field.

8. Do an internet search for recent trends or discoveries (within 5 years or earlier) in one of the five chemistry areas. Provide detailed information of what the recent trend or discovery is all about.

9. List different suggestions on how to study for chemistry? CHECK The Video on Libretext.


Homework – Chapter 1

Consider an application that transmits data at a steady rate (for example, the sender generates an N-bit unit of data every k time units, where k is small and fixed). Also, when such an application starts, it will continue running for a relatively long period of time. Answer the following questions, briefly justifying your answer:

a. Would a packet-switched network or a circuit-switched network be more appropriate for this application? Why?

For this application I would choose an circuit-switched network. I would choose this because this application will be running for a relatively long period of time. Knowing the transmission rate is steady, we can reserve bandwidth for each application session circuit.

b. Suppose that a packet-switched network is used and the only traffic in this network comes from such applications as described above. Furthermore, assume that the sum of the application data rates is less than the capacities of each and every link. Is some form of congestion control needed? Why?

The slowest case, in which there is the most interference, the applications will transmit over more than one particular network links. This means that each link offers enough bandwidth to handle the range of the applications’ data rates, meaning little queuing occurs.

Consider the circuit-switched network in Figure 1.13. Recall that there are 4 circuits on each link. Label the four switches A, B, C and D, going in the clockwise direction.

a. What is the maximum number of simultaneous connections that can be in progress at any one time in this network?

The maximum number of simultaneous connections that can be in progress at one time in this network is 16.

b. Suppose that all connections are between switches A and C. What is the maximum number of simultaneous connections that can be in progress?

If the connections only go from A to C there are 8 possible simultaneous connections

c. Suppose we want to make four connections between switches A and C, and another four connections between switches B and D. Can we route these calls through the four links to accommodate all eight connections?

Yes, we can. We can go A -> B -> C and A -> D -> C

This elementary problem begins to explore propagation delay and transmission delay, two central concepts in data networking. Consider two hosts, A and B, connected by a single link of rate R bps. Suppose that the two hosts are separated by m meters, and suppose the propagation speed along the link is s meters/sec. Host A is to send a packet of size L bits to Host B.

a. Express the propagation delay, dprop, in terms of m and s.

b. Determine the transmission time of the packet, dtrans, in terms of L and R.

c. Ignoring processing and queuing delays, obtain an expression for the end-to-end delay.

d. Suppose Host A begins to transmit the packet at time t = 0. At time t = dtrans, where is the last bit of the packet?

It will be leaving Host A

e. Suppose dprop is greater than dtrans. At time t = dtrans, where is the first bit of the packet?

If dprop is greater than dtrans then at t = dtrans the first bit of the packet is on its way but has not yet reached the second Host.

f. Suppose dprop is less than dtrans. At time t = dtrans, where is the first bit of the packet?

If dprop is less than dtrans then at t=dtrans the first bit of the packet will have reached its next Host.

g. Suppose s = 2.5 * 108, L = 120 bits, and R = 56 kbps. Find the distance m so that dprop equals dtrans.

to find distance m so dprop = dtrans, m = (L/R)(S) = (120/28吆^3)(2.5吆^8) = 535,714 m

In this problem, we consider sending real-time voice from Host A to Host B over a packet-switched network (VoIP). Host A converts analog voice to a digital 64 kbps bit stream on the fly. Host A then groups the bits into 56-byte packets. There is one link between Hosts A and B its transmission rate is 2 Mbps and its propagation delay is 10 msec. As soon as Host A gathers a packet, it sends it to Host B. As soon as Host B receives an entire packet, it converts the packet’s bits to an analog signal. How much time elapses from the time a bit is created (from the original analog signal at Host A) until the bit is decoded (as part of the analog signal at Host B)?

While it waits for the other bits in the group to reach,

transmit = (56࡮)/(64�) = 7 ms

dtrans = (56࡮)/2Mbps = 0.224 ms

total time = transmit + dprop + dtrans = 7 + 10 + 0.224 = 17.224 ms

Consider a packet of length L which begins at end system A and travels over three links to a destination end system. These three links are connected by two packet switches. Let di, si, and R denote the length, propagation speed, and the transmission rate of link i, for i = 1, 2, 3. The packet switch delays each packet by dproci. Assuming no queuing delays, in terms of d, (i = 1,2,3), and L, what is the total end-to-end delay for the packet? Suppose now the packet is 1,500 bytes, the propagation speed on all three links is 2.5 *108 m/s, the transmission rates of all three links are 2 Mbps, the packet switch processing delay is 3 msec, the length of the first link is 5,000 km, the length of the second link is 4,000 km, and the length of the last link is 1,000 km. For these values, what is the end-to-end delay?

Consider a router buffer preceding an outbound link. In this problem, you will use Little’s formula, a famous formula from queuing theory. Let N denote the average number of packets in the buffer plus the packet being transmitted. Let a denote the rate of packets arriving at the link. Let d denote the average total delay (i.e., the queuing delay plus the transmission delay) experienced by a packet. Little’s formula is N = a * d. Suppose that on average, the buffer contains 10 packets, and the average packet queuing delay is 10 msec. The link’s transmission rate is 100 packets/sec. Using Little’s formula, what is the average packet arrival rate, assuming there is no packet loss?

n/20ms = a = 10/0.020 = 500 packets per second

Consider Figure 1.19(b). Suppose that each link between the server and the client has a packet loss probability p, and the packet loss probabilities for these links are independent. What is the probability that a packet (sent by the server) is successfully received by the receiver? If a packet is lost in the path from the server to the client, then the server will re-transmit the packet. On average, how many times will the server re-transmit the packet in order for the client to successfully receive the packet?

(1-P) is the probability that the packet made it.

1-p^N is the probability that the packet made all of the hops.

Suppose two hosts, A and B, are separated by 20,000 kilometers and are connected by a direct link of R = 2 Mbps. Suppose the propagation speed over the link is 2.5*108 meters/sec.

a. Calculate the bandwidth-delay product, R * dprop.

bandwidth-delay product = 2,000,000 x .08 = 160,000 bits

b. Consider sending a file of 800,000 bits from Host A to Host B. Suppose the file is sent continuously as one large message. What is the maximum number of bits that will be in the link at any given time?

Max number of bits is 160,000

c. Provide an interpretation of the bandwidth-delay product.

Max number of bits in link at once.

d. What is the width (in meters) of a bit in the link? Is it longer than a football field?

(20,000,000/.08)[meters/bits] x 1bit

e. Derive a general expression for the width of a bit in terms of the propagation speed s, the transmission rate R, and the length of the link m.

In modern packet-switched networks, including the Internet, the source host segments long, application-layer messages (for example, an image or a music file) into smaller packets and sends the packets into the network. The receiver then reassembles the packets back into the original message. We refer to this process as message segmentation. Figure 1.27 illustrates the end-to-end transport of a message with and without message segmentation. Consider a message that is 8 • 10^6 bits long that is to be sent from source to destination in Figure 1.27. Suppose each link in the figure is 2 Mbps. Ignore propagation, queuing, and processing delays.

a. Consider sending the message from source to destination without message segmentation. How long does it take to move the message from the source host to the first packet switch? Keeping in mind that each switch uses store-and-forward packet switching, what is the total time to move the message from source host to destination host?

4 seconds for switch number 1 so 12 seconds overall.

b. Now suppose that the message is segmented into 800 packets, with each packet being 10,000 bits long. How long does it take to move the first packet from source host to the first switch? When the first packet is being sent from the first switch to the second switch, the second packet is being sent from the source host to the first switch. At what time will the second packet be fully received at the first switch?

First packet to reach is 10000/2000000 = 5ms . It will take 20ms for the second packet to be received at first switch.

c. How long does it take to move the file from source host to destination host when message segmentation is used? Compare this result with your answer in part (a) and comment.

.005 * 799 = 4 seconds. In part (a) it took overall of 12 seconds, so this is quicker.

d. In addition to reducing delay, what are reasons to use message segmentation?

Better practice in order to reduce packet loss.

e. Discuss the drawbacks of message segmentation.

Consider sending a large file of F bits from Host A to Host B. There are three links (and two switches) between A and B, and the links are uncongested (that is, no queuing delays). Host A segments the file into segments of S bits each and adds 80 bits of header to each segment, forming packets of L = 80 + S bits. Each link has a transmission rate of R bps. Find the value of S that minimizes the delay of moving the file from Host A to Host B. Disregard propagation delay.


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Connect Managerial Accounting Homework Chapter 1

Q1. Listed here are product costs for the production of soccer balls.

Identify each cost (a) as either fixed or variable and (b) as either direct or indirect by selecting the appropriate dropdowns.

Q2. TechPro offers instructional courses in e-commerce website design. The company holds classes in a building that it owns.

Identify each of TechPro’s costs below as (a) variable or fixed and (b) direct or indirect by selecting the appropriate dropdowns. Assume the cost object is an individual class.

Q3. Current assets for two different companies at fiscal year-end are listed here. One is a manufacturer, Rayzer Skis Mfg., and the other, Sunrise Foods, is a grocery distribution company.

Account Company 1 Company 2
Cash $11,000 $9,000
Raw materials inventory 39,875
Merchandise inventory 42,875
Work in process inventory 29,000
Finished goods inventory 49,000
Accounts receivable, net 61,000 71,000
Prepaid expenses 3,500 700

Required:
1. Identify which set of numbers relates to the manufacturer and which to the merchandiser.

2a. & 2b. Prepare the current asset section for each company from this information.

Q4. The following data is provided for Garcon Company and Pepper Company.

Garcon Company Pepper Company
Beginning finished goods inventory $12,900 $17,500
Beginning work in process inventory 16,700 22,950
Beginning raw materials inventory (direct materials) 9,800 14,250
Rental cost on factory equipment 31,250 26,050
Direct labor 19,600 40,200
Ending finished goods inventory 18,050 14,300
Ending work in process inventory 24,100 16,600
Ending raw materials inventory 7,700 8,800
Factory utilities 10,500 15,000
Factory supplies used (indirect materials) 13,300 5,600
General and administrative expenses 23,000 54,500
Indirect labor 1,500 9,340
Repairs—Factory equipment 5,660 1,750
Raw materials purchases 47,000 57,000
Selling expenses 61,200 55,900
Sales 196,530 307,510
Cash 31,000 24,200
Factory equipment, net 282,500 139,825
Accounts receivable, net 13,600 21,200

Required:
1. Complete the table to find the cost of goods manufactured for both Garcon Company and Pepper Company for the year ended December 31, 2019.


2. Complete the table to calculate the cost of goods sold for both Garcon Company and Pepper Company for the year ended December 31, 2019.

Q5. The following data is provided for Garcon Company and Pepper Company.

Garcon Company Pepper Company
Beginning finished goods inventory $12,900 $17,500
Beginning work in process inventory 16,700 22,950
Beginning raw materials inventory (direct materials) 9,800 14,250
Rental cost on factory equipment 31,250 26,050
Direct labor 19,600 40,200
Ending finished goods inventory 18,050 14,300
Ending work in process inventory 24,100 16,600
Ending raw materials inventory 7,700 8,800
Factory utilities 10,500 15,000
Factory supplies used (indirect materials) 13,300 5,600
General and administrative expenses 23,000 54,500
Indirect labor 1,500 9,340
Repairs—Factory equipment 5,660 1,750
Raw materials purchases 47,000 57,000
Selling expenses 61,200 55,900
Sales 196,530 307,510
Cash 31,000 24,200
Factory equipment, net 282,500 139,825
Accounts receivable, net 13,600 21,200

Required:
1. Prepare income statements for both Garcon Company and Pepper Company.


2. Prepare the current assets section of the balance sheet for each company.

Q6. The following data is provided for Garcon Company and Pepper Company.

Garcon Company Pepper Company
Beginning finished goods inventory $12,900 $17,500
Beginning work in process inventory 16,700 22,950
Beginning raw materials inventory (direct materials) 9,800 14,250
Rental cost on factory equipment 31,250 26,050
Direct labor 19,600 40,200
Ending finished goods inventory 18,050 14,300
Ending work in process inventory 24,100 16,600
Ending raw materials inventory 7,700 8,800
Factory utilities 10,500 15,000
Factory supplies used (indirect materials) 13,300 5,600
General and administrative expenses 23,000 54,500
Indirect labor 1,500 9,340
Repairs—Factory equipment 5,660 1,750
Raw materials purchases 47,000 57,000
Selling expenses 61,200 55,900
Sales 196,530 307,510
Cash 31,000 24,200
Factory equipment, net 282,500 139,825
Accounts receivable, net 13,600 21,200

Required:
1. Compute the total prime costs for both Garcon Company and Pepper Company.


2. Compute the total conversion costs for both Garcon Company and Pepper Company.

Unimart Precision Manufacturing
Beginning inventory
Merchandise $321,000
Finished goods $642,000
Cost of purchases 510,000
Cost of goods manufactured 840,000
Ending inventory
Merchandise 221,000
Finished goods 215,000

Compute cost of goods sold for each of these two companies for the year.

Q8. The following selected account balances are provided for Delray Mfg.

Sales $1,155,000
Raw materials inventory, beginning 38,000
Work in process inventory, beginning 54,000
Finished goods inventory, beginning 65,100
Raw materials purchases 152,500
Direct labor 230,000
Factory supplies used (indirect materials) 24,500
Indirect labor 57,000
Repairs—Factory equipment 5,250
Rent cost of factory building 52,000
Advertising expense 84,000
General and administrative expenses 131,000
Raw materials inventory, ending 46,500
Work in process inventory, ending 39,000
Finished goods inventory, ending 68,300

Prepare its schedule of cost of goods manufactured for the current year ended December 31.

Q9. The following selected account balances are provided for Delray Mfg.

Sales $1,155,000
Raw materials inventory, beginning 38,000
Work in process inventory, beginning 54,000
Finished goods inventory, beginning 65,100
Raw materials purchases 152,500
Direct labor 230,000
Factory supplies used (indirect materials) 24,500
Indirect labor 57,000
Repairs—Factory equipment 5,250
Rent cost of factory building 52,000
Advertising expense 84,000
General and administrative expenses 131,000
Raw materials inventory, ending 46,500
Work in process inventory, ending 39,000
Finished goods inventory, ending 68,300

Prepare an income statement for Delray Mfg. (a manufacturer).

Q10. Beck Manufacturing reports the following information in T-account form for 2019.

Raw Materials Inventory
Begin. Inv. 10,600
Purchases 56,000
Avail. for use 66,600
DM used 49,000
End. Inv. 17,600

Work in Process Inventory
Begin. Inv. 15,200
DM used 49,000
Direct labor 29,500
Overhead 64,500
Manuf. costs 158,200
Cost of goods manuf. 144,800
End. Inv. 13,400

Finished Goods Inventory
Begin. Inv. 20,200
Cost of goods manuf. 144,800
Avail. for sale 165,000
Cost of Goods Sold 145,000
End. Inv. 20,000

Required:
1. Prepare the schedule of cost of goods manufactured for the year.


2. Compute cost of goods sold for the year.

Q11. The following calendar year-end information is taken from the December 31, 2019, adjusted trial balance and other records of Leone Company.

Advertising expense $28,000 Direct labor $693,900
Depreciation expense—Office equipment 8,800 Income taxes expense 295,900
Depreciation expense—Selling equipment 10,600 Indirect labor 59,600
Depreciation expense—Factory equipment 36,100 Miscellaneous production costs 11,000
Factory supervision 120,300 Office salaries expense 70,000
Factory supplies used 9,800 Raw materials purchases 996,000
Factory utilities 42,000 Rent expense—Office space 27,000
Inventories Rent expense—Selling space 26,400
Raw materials, December 31, 2018 159,100 Rent expense—Factory building 78,700
Raw materials, December 31, 2019 177,000 Maintenance expense—Factory equipment 36,700
Work in process, December 31, 2018 18,500 Sales 4,485,800
Work in process, December 31, 2019 24,000 Sales salaries expense 393,200
Finished goods, December 31, 2018 167,800
Finished goods, December 31, 2019 138,200

Required:
1. Prepare the company’s 2019 schedule of cost of goods manufactured.

Q12. The following calendar year-end information is taken from the December 31, 2019, adjusted trial balance and other records of Leone Company.

Advertising expense $28,000 Direct labor $693,900
Depreciation expense—Office equipment 8,800 Income taxes expense 295,900
Depreciation expense—Selling equipment 10,600 Indirect labor 59,600
Depreciation expense—Factory equipment 36,100 Miscellaneous production costs 11,000
Factory supervision 120,300 Office salaries expense 70,000
Factory supplies used 9,800 Raw materials purchases 996,000
Factory utilities 42,000 Rent expense—Office space 27,000
Inventories Rent expense—Selling space 26,400
Raw materials, December 31, 2018 159,100 Rent expense—Factory building 78,700
Raw materials, December 31, 2019 177,000 Maintenance expense—Factory equipment 36,700
Work in process, December 31, 2018 18,500 Sales 4,485,800
Work in process, December 31, 2019 24,000 Sales salaries expense 393,200
Finished goods, December 31, 2018 167,800
Finished goods, December 31, 2019 138,200

2. Prepare the company’s 2019 income statement that reports separate categories for (a) selling expenses and (b) general and administrative expenses.

Q13. Shown here are annual financial data taken from two different companies.

Music World Retail Wave-Board Manufacturing
Beginning inventory
Merchandise $225,000
Finished goods $320,000
Cost of purchases 310,000
Cost of goods manufactured 590,000
Ending inventory
Merchandise 160,000
Finished goods 150,000

Required:
1. Prepare the cost of goods sold section of the income statement for the year for each company in Merchandising Business and Manufacturing Business.

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CS 330: Homework: Chapter 1

Suppose users share a 2 Mbps link. Also suppose each user transmits continuously at 1 Mbps when transmitting, but each user transmits only 20 percent of the time. (See the discussion of statistical multiplexing in Section 1.3.)

  • When circuit switching is used, how many users can be supported?
  • For the remainder of this problem, suppose packet switching is used. Why will there be essentially no queuing delay before the link if two or fewer users transmit at the same time? Why will there be a queuing delay if three users transmit at the same time?
  • Find the probability that a given user is transmitting.
  • Suppose now there are three users. Find the probability that at any given time, all three users are transmitting simultaneously. Find the fraction of time during which the queue grows.

Consider sending a packet from a source host to a destination host over a fixed route. List the delay components in the end-to-end delay. Which of these delays are constant and which are variable?

Suppose Host A wants to send a large file to Host B. The path from Host A to Host B has three links, of rates R1 = 500 kbps, R2 = 2 Mbps, and R3 = 1 Mbps.

  • Assuming no other traffic in the network, what is the throughput for the file transfer?
  • Suppose the file is 4 million bytes. Dividing the file size by the throughput, roughly how long will it take to transfer the file to Host B?
  • Repeat (a) and (b), but now with R reduced to 100 kbps.

This elementary problem begins to explore propagation delay and transmission delay, two central concepts in data networking. Consider two hosts, A and B, connected by a single link of rate R bps. Suppose that the two hosts are separated by m meters, and suppose the propagation speed along the link is s meters/sec. Host A is to send a packet of size L bits to Host B.

  • Express the propagation delay, dprop, in terms of m and s.
  • Determine the transmission time of the packet, dtrans, in terms of L and R.
  • Ignoring processing and queuing delays, obtain an expression for the end-to-end delay.
  • Suppose Host A begins to transmit the packet at time t = 0. At time t = dtrans, where is the last bit of the packet?
  • Suppose dprop is greater than dtrans. At time t = dtrans, where is the first bit of the packet?
  • Suppose dprop is less than dtrans. At time t = dtrans, where is the first bit of the packet?
  • Suppose s = 2.5 · 10 8 , L = 120 bits, and R = 56 kbps. Find the distance m so that dprop equals dtrans.

Submit

Post your solutions in Marmoset by the scheduled due date in the syllabus.


Chapter 1 and 2 Homework (McGraw-Hill Connect)

On October 1, Ebony Ernst organized Ernst Consulting on October 3, the owner contributed $82,780 in assets in exchange for its common stock to launch the business. On October 31, the company’s records show the following items and amounts.

Cash $15,760 Cash dividends $640
Accounts receivable $10,600 Consulting revenue $10,600
Office supplies $1,960 Rent expense $2,270
Land $46,030 Salaries expense $5,450
Office equipment $16,580 Telephone expense $760
Accounts payable $7,250 Miscellaneous expenses $580
Common Stock $82,780

Also assume the following:

  1. The owner’s initial investment consists of $36,750 cash and $46,030 in land in exchange for its common stock..
  2. The company’s $16,580 equipment purchase is paid in cash.
  3. The accounts payable balance of $7,250 consists of the $1,960 office supplies purchase and $5,290 in employee salaries yet to be paid.
  4. The company’s rent, telephone, and miscellaneous expenses are paid in cash.
  5. No cash has been collected on the $10,600 consulting fees earned.

Using the above information prepare an October 31 statement of cash flows for Ernst Consulting. (Cash outflows should be indicated by a minus sign.)

Following are the transactions of a new company called Pose-for-Pics.

Aug. 1 Madison Harris, the owner, invested $8,200 cash and $35,200 of photography equipment in the company in exchange for common stock.
2 The company paid $3,800 cash for an insurance policy covering the next 24 months.
5 The company purchased office supplies for $1,050 cash.
20 The company received $5,031 cash in photography fees earned.
31 The company paid $845 cash for August utilities.

  1. Post the transactions to the T-accounts.
  2. Use the amounts from the T-accounts in Requirement (1) to prepare an August 31 trial balance for Pose-for-Pics.

The transactions of Spade Company appear below.

  1. Kacy Spade, owner, invested $18,750 cash in the company in exchange for common stock.
  2. The company purchased office supplies for $544 cash.
  3. The company purchased $10,369 of office equipment on credit.
  4. The company received $2,213 cash as fees for services provided to a customer.
  5. The company paid $10,369 cash to settle the payable for the office equipment purchased in transaction c.
  6. The company billed a customer $3,975 as fees for services provided.
  7. The company paid $530 cash for the monthly rent.
  8. The company collected $1,670 cash as partial payment for the account receivable created in transaction f.
  9. The company paid $1,000 cash in dividends to the owner (sole shareholder).

Karla Tanner opens a Web consulting business called Linkworks and completes the following transactions in its first month of operations.

April 1 Tanner invested $90,000 cash along with office equipment valued at $21,600 n the company in exchange for common stock.
2 The company prepaid $7,200 cash for 12 months’ rent for office space. (Hint: Debit Prepaid Rent for $7,200.)
3 The company made credit purchases for $10,800 in office equipment and $2,160 in office supplies. Payment is due within 10 days.
6 The company completed services for a client and immediately received $2,000 cash.
9 The company completed a $7,200 project for a client, who must pay within 30 days.
13 The company paid $12,960 cash to settle the account payable created on April 3.
19 The company paid $6,000 cash for the premium on a 12-month insurance policy. (Hint: Debit Prepaid Insurance for $6,000.)
22 The company received $5,760 cash as partial payment for the work completed on April 9.
25 The company completed work for another client for $2,640 on credit.
28 The company paid $6,200 cash in dividends.
29 The company purchased $720 of additional office supplies on credit.
30 The company paid $700 cash for this month’s utility bill.

  1. Prepare general journal entries to record these transactions using the following titles: Cash (101) Accounts Receivable (106) Office Supplies (124) Prepaid Insurance (128) Prepaid Rent (131) Office Equipment (163) Accounts Payable (201) Common Stock (307) Dividends (319) Services Revenue (403) and Utilities Expense (690).
  2. Post the journal entries from part 1 to the ledger accounts.
  3. Prepare a trial balance as of April 30.

Kiona Co. set up a petty cash fund for payments of small amounts. The following transactions involving the petty cash fund occurred in May (the last month of the company’s fiscal year).

May 1 Prepared a company check for $350 to establish the petty cash fund.

15 Prepared a company check to replenish the fund for the following expenditures made since May 1.

a. Paid $109.20 for janitorial services.

b. Paid $89.15 for miscellaneous expenses.

c. Paid postage expenses of $60.90.

d. Paid $80.01 to The County Gazette (the local newspaper) for an advertisement.

e. Counted $26.84 remaining in the petty cashbox.

16 Prepared a company check for $200 to increase the fund to $550.

31 The petty cashier reports that $370.27 cash remains in the fund. A company check is drawn to replenish the fund for the following expenditures made since May 15.

f. Paid postage expenses of $59.10. g. Reimbursed the office manager for business mileage, $47.05.

h. Paid $48.58 to deliver merchandise to a customer, terms FOB destination.

31 The company decides that the May 16 increase in the fund was too large. It reduces the fund by $50, leaving a total of $500.

Prepare journal entries to establish the fund on May 1, to replenish it on May 15 and on May 31, and to reflect any increase or decrease in the fund balance on May 16 and May 31. (Round your answers to 2 decimal places.)

Need help with Chapter 1 and 2 Homework (McGraw-Hill Connect) please:


Online Accounting & Bookkeeping Solution for Small Businesses.

On January 3, 2018, Matteson Corporation acquired 40 percent of the outstanding common stock of O'Toole Company for $1,160,000. This acquisition gave Matteson the ability to exercise significant influence over the investee. The book value of the acquired shares was $820,000. Any excess cost over the underlying book value was assigned to a copyright that was undervalued on its balance sheet. This copyright has a remaining useful life of 10 years. For the year ended December 31, 2018, O'Toole reported net income of $260,000 and declared cash dividends of $50,000. At December 31, 2018, what should Matteson report as its investment in O'Toole under the equity method?

Milani, Inc., acquired 10 percent of Seida Corporation on January 1, 2017, for $190,000 and appropriately accounted for the investment using the fair-value method. On January 1, 2018, Milani purchased an additional 30 percent of Seida for $600,000 which resulted in significant influence over Seida. On that date, the fair value of Seida's common stock was $2,000,000 in total. Seida's January 1, 2018 book value equaled $1,850,000, although land was undervalued by $120,000. Any additional excess fair value over Seida's book value was attributable to a trademark with an 8-year remaining life. During 2018, Seida reported income of $300,000 and declared and paid dividends of $110,000. Prepare the 2018 journal entries for Milani related to its investment in Seida. (If no entry is required for a transaction/event, select "No journal entry required" in the first account field.)

Harper, Inc., acquires 40 percent of the outstanding voting stock of Kinman Company on January 1, 2017, for $210,000 in cash. The book value of Kinman's net assets on that date was $400,000, although one of the company's buildings, with a $60,000 carrying amount, was actually worth $100,000. This building had a 10-year remaining life. Kinman owned a royalty agreement with a 20-year remaining life that was undervalued by $85,000.

Kinman sold inventory with an original cost of $60,000 to Harper during 2017 at a price of $90,000. Harper still held $15,000 (transfer price) of this amount in inventory as of December 31, 2017. These goods are to be sold to outside parties during 2018.

Kinman reported a $40,000 net loss and a $20,000 other comprehensive loss for 2017. The company still manages to declare and pay a $10,000 cash dividend during the year.

During 2018, Kinman reported a $40,000 net income and declared and paid a cash dividend of $12,000. It made additional inventory sales of $80,000 to Harper during the period. The original cost of the merchandise was $50,000. All but 30 percent of this inventory had been resold to outside parties by the end of the 2018 fiscal year.

Prepare all journal entries for Harper for 2017 and 2018 in connection with this investment. Assume that the equity method is applied. (If no entry is required for a transaction/event, select "No journal entry required" in the first account field. Do not round intermediate calculations.)

Matthew Inc. owns 30 percent of the outstanding stock of Lindman Company and has the ability to significantly influence the investee's operations and decision making. On January 1, 2018, the balance in the Investment in Lindman account is $335,000. Amortization associated with this acquisition is $9,000 per year. In 2018, Lindman earns an income of $90,000 and declares cash dividends of $30,000. Previously, in 2017, Lindman had sold inventory costing $24,000 to Matthew for $40,000. Matthew consumed all but 25 percent of this merchandise during 2017 and used the rest during 2018. Lindman sold additional inventory costing $28,000 to Matthew for $50,000 in 2018. Matthew did not consume 40 percent of these 2018 purchases from Lindman until 2019


1.1: Homework Chapter 1

Description

MAT 540 Week 1 Homework Chapter 1

Annie McCoy, a student at Tech, plans to open a hot dog stand inside Tech's football stadium during home games. There are seven home games scheduled for the upcoming season. She must pay the Tech athletic department a vendor's fee of 2,500 for the season. Her stand and other equipment will cost her 3,100 for the season. She estimates that each hot dog she sells will cost her . She has talked to friends at other universities who sell hot dogs at games. Based on their information and the athletic department's forecast that each game will sell out, she anticipates that she will sell approximately 2,000 hot dogs during each game.


1.1: Homework Chapter 1

Chapter 1 homework solutions to odd-numbered problems (even number problems are answered in the back of the textbook)

#7, 9, 18, 23, 30, 34, 36, 40, 47, 48, 56, 68, 71, 75, 80, 93, 94

7. a) a plum ripens: a chemical change. The color, texture, and taste changes irreversibly. These are all due to chemical changes in the sugars and proteins which make up the plum.

b) water boils: a physical change. Water is transformed from the liquid state to the gaseous state.

c) a glass window breaks: a physical change. The only change is the size of the pieces of glass.

d) food is digested: a chemical change. Acids and enzymes in the body act to change the food irreversibly into different chemical substances.

9. a) iron melts at 1535 Celsius: a physical property

b) alcohol is flammable: this is a chemical property. Flammability is the ability to burn in air, which is a chemical change.

c) the metal used in artificial hip joints does not corrode in the body: a chemical property. Again, this describes a chemical change (corrosion of metal) and is this a chemical property.

d) a 1 in cube of Al weighs less than a 1 in cube of Pb: this is a physical property as it pertains to density

e) an antacid neutralizes acid in the stomach: this is a chemical property as it pertains to the reaction of stomach acid with a base (an antacid tablet).


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