Articles

11.2: Footnotes


1

However, neither of the two volumes contains more than the principal fragment of BM 15285. A new edition based on the three fragments that are known today can be found in Eleanor Robson, Mesopotamian Mathematics 2100–1600 BC. Technical Constants in Bureaucracy and Education. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1999.

2

In other words, the edition is almost useless for non-specialists, even for historians of mathematics who do not understand the Old Babylonian tradition too well; several general histories of mathematics or algebra contain horrendous mistakes going back to Evert Bruins’s commentary.


1. Type a sentence into the body of your paper. You will insert the superscript number that points the reader to your footnote after any punctuation marks in your phrase or sentence, with no space. If you are quoting a source, the superscript should go immediately after the closing quotation mark (as in the first example below). If you are citing a source but not quoting it, the superscript should go at the end of the sentence (as in the second example):

  • High crosses, which may at some point have been intended to function as &ldquofocal point[s] for preaching, prayer, or penance,&rdquo 4 are regularly intricately decorated with carved images that depict religious ideas.
  • Here God's glory, like God's power, is a key indicator of God's self, but does not exhaust God's identity. 11

2. Place your cursor at the point where you wish to insert the superscript number for your footnote.

3. Go to the "References" tab in the MS Word toolbar.

4. Select the "Insert footnote" icon at the top of the page. Word will place a superscript in the body of your paper and create a footnote in the footer, where you can enter the citation information. (The default font size for footnotes is 10-pt some instructors prefer 12-pt, so you might want to ask if your professor has a preference.)

Here is another way to insert a footnote in Word, starting at step 3 above:

3. Go to "Insert" in the Word menu bar (very top of the page). Select "Footnote. ".

4. A dialogue box will pop up that allows you to change the position and other elements of your footnote. The screencap below shows the default settings, which are the ones you want.


49 CFR § 393.11 - Lamps and reflective devices.

(1) Lamps and reflex reflectors. Table 1 specifies the requirements for lamps, reflective devices and associated equipment by the type of commercial motor vehicle. The diagrams in this section illustrate the position of the lamps, reflective devices and associated equipment specified in Table 1. All commercial motor vehicles manufactured on or after December 25, 1968, must, at a minimum, meet the applicable requirements of 49 CFR 571.108 (FMVSS No. 108) in effect at the time of manufacture of the vehicle. Commercial motor vehicles manufactured before December 25, 1968, must, at a minimum, meet the requirements of subpart B of part 393 in effect at the time of manufacture.

(2) Exceptions: Pole trailers and trailer converter dollies must meet the part 393 requirements for lamps, reflective devices and electrical equipment in effect at the time of manufacture. Trailers which are equipped with conspicuity material which meets the requirements of § 393.11(b) are not required to be equipped with the reflex reflectors listed in Table 1 if -

(i) The conspicuity material is placed at the locations where reflex reflectors are required by Table 1 and

(ii) The conspicuity material when installed on the motor vehicle meets the visibility requirements for the reflex reflectors.

(b) Conspicuity Systems. Each trailer of 2,032 mm (80 inches) or more overall width, and with a GVWR over 4,536 kg (10,000 pounds), manufactured on or after December 1, 1993, except pole trailers and trailers designed exclusively for living or office use, shall be equipped with either retroreflective sheeting that meets the requirements of FMVSS No. 108 (S5.7.1), reflex reflectors that meet the requirements FMVSS No. 108 (S5.7.2), or a combination of retroreflective sheeting and reflex reflectors that meet the requirements of FMVSS No. 108 (S5.7.3). The conspicuity system shall be installed and located as specified in FMVSS No. 108 [S5.7.1.4 (for retroreflective sheeting), S5.7.2.2 (for reflex reflectors), S5.7.3 (for a combination of sheeting and reflectors)] and have certification and markings as required by S5.7.1.5 (for retroreflective tape) and S5.7.2.3 (for reflex reflectors).

(c) Prohibition on the use of amber stop lamps and tail lamps. No commercial motor vehicle may be equipped with an amber stop lamp, a tail lamp, or other lamp which is optically combined with an amber stop lamp or tail lamp.

Table 1 of § 393.11 - Required Lamps and Reflectors on Commercial Motor Vehicles

Item on the vehicle Quantity Color Location Position Height above the road surface in millimeters (mm) (with English units in parenthesis) measured from the center of the lamp at curb weight Vehicles for which the devices are required
Headlamps 2 White Front On the front at the same height, with an equal number at each side of the vertical center line as far apart as practicable Not less than 559 mm (22 inches) nor more than 1,372 mm (54 inches) A, B, C
Turn signal (front). See footnotes #2 and 12 2 Amber At or near the front One on each side of the vertical centerline at the same height and as far apart as practicable Not less than 381 mm (15 inches) nor more than 2,108 mm (83 inches) A, B, C
Identification lamps (front). See footnote #1 3 Amber Front As close as practicable to the top of the vehicle, at the same height, and as close as practicable to the vertical centerline of the vehicle (or the vertical centerline of the cab where different from the centerline of the vehicle) with lamp centers spaced not less than 152 mm (6 inches) or more than 305 mm (12 inches) apart. Alternatively, the front lamps may be located as close as practicable to the top of the cab All three on the same level as close as practicable to the top of the motor vehicle B, C
Tail lamps. See footnotes #5 and 11 2 Red Rear One lamp on each side of the vertical centerline at the same height and as far apart as practicable Both on the same level between 381 mm (15 inches) and 1,829 mm (72 inches) A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H
Stop lamps. See footnotes #5 and 13 2 Red Rear One lamp on each side of the vertical centerline at the same height and as far apart as practicable Both on the same level between 381 mm (15 inches) and 1,829 mm (72 inches) A, B, C, D, E, F, G
Clearance lamps. See footnotes #8, 9, 10, 15 & 17 2 Amber One on each side of the front of the vehicle One on each side of the vertical centerline to indicate overall width Both on the same level as high as practicable B, C, D, G, H
2 Red One on each side of the rear of the vehicle One on each side of the vertical centerline to indicate overall width Both on the same level as high as practicable B, D, G, H
Reflex reflector, intermediate (side) 2 Amber One on each side At or near the midpoint between the front and rear side marker lamps, if the length of the vehicle is more than 9,144 mm (30 feet) Between 381 mm (15inches) and 1,524 (60 inches) A, B, D, F, G
Reflex reflector (rear). See footnotes #5, 6, and 8 2 Red Rear One on each side of the vertical centerline, as far apart as practicable and at the same height Both on the same level, between 381 mm (15 inches) and 1,524 mm (60 inches) A, B, C, D, E, F, G
Reflex reflector (rear side). 2 Red One on each side (rear) As far to the rear as practicable Both on the same level, between 381 mm (15 inches) and 1,524 mm (60 inches) A, B, D, F, G
Reflex reflector (front side). See footnote #16 2 Amber One on each side (front) As far to the front as practicable Between 381 mm (15 inches) and 1,524 mm (60 inches) A, B, C, D, F, G
License plate lamp (rear). See footnote #11 1 White At rear license plate to illuminate the plate from the top or sides No requirements A, B, C, D, F, G
Side marker lamp (front). See footnote #16 2 Amber One on each side As far to the front as practicable Not less than 381 mm (15 inches) A, B, C, D, F
Side marker lamp intermediate 2 Amber One on each side At or near the midpoint between the front and rear side marker lamps, if the length of the vehicle is more than 9,144 mm (30 feet) Not less tan 381 mm (15 inches) A, B, D, F, G
Side marker lamp (rear). See footnotes #4 and 8 2 Red One on each side As far to the rear as practicable Not less than 381 mm (15 inches), and on the rear of trailers not more than 1,524 mm (60 inches) A, B, D, F, G
Turn signal (rear). See footnotes #5 and 12 2 Amber or red Rear One lamp on each side of the vertical centerline as far apart as practicable Both on the same level, between 381 mm (15 inches) and 2,108 mm (83 inches) A, B, C, D, E, F, G
Identification lamp (rear). See footnotes #3, 7, and 15 3 Red Rear One as close as practicable to the vertical centerline. One on each side with lamp centers spaced not less than 152 mm (6 inches) or more than 305 mm (12 inches) apart All three on the same level as close as practicable to the top of the vehicle B, D, G
Vehicular hazard warning signal flasher lamps. See footnotes #5 and 12 2 Amber Front One lamp on each side of the vertical centerline, as far apart as practicable Both on the same level, between 381 mm (15 inches) and 2,108 mm (83 inches) A, B, C
2 Amber or red Rear One lamp on each side of the vertical centerline, as far apart as practicable Both on the same level, between 381 mm (15 inches) and 2,108 mm (83 inches) A, B, C, D, E, F, G
Backup lamp. See footnote #14 1 or 2 White Rear Rear No requirement A, B, C
Parking lamp 2 Amber or white Front One lamp on each side of the vertical centerline, as far apart as practicable Both on the same level, between 381 mm (15 inches) and 2,108 mm (83 inches) A

Legend: Types of commercial motor vehicles shown in the last column of Table 1.

A. Buses and trucks less than 2,032 mm (80 inches) in overall width.

B. Buses and trucks 2,032 mm (80 inches) or more in overall width.

D. Semitrailers and full trailers 2,032 mm (80 inches) or more in overall width except converter dollies.

F. Semitrailers and full trailers less than 2,032 mm (80 inches) in overall width.

Note: Lamps and reflectors may be combined as permitted by § 393.22 and S5.4 of 49 CFR 571.108, Equipment combinations.

Footnote - 1 Identification lamps may be mounted on the vertical centerline of the cab where different from the centerline of the vehicle, except where the cab is not more than 42 inches wide at the front roofline, then a single lamp at the center of the cab shall be deemed to comply with the requirements for identification lamps. No part of the identification lamps or their mountings may extend below the top of the vehicle windshield.

Footnote - 2 Unless the turn signals on the front are so constructed (double-faced) and located as to be visible to passing drivers, two turn signals are required on the rear of the truck tractor, one at each side as far apart as practicable.

Footnote - 3 The identification lamps need not be visible or lighted if obscured by a vehicle in the same combination.

Footnote - 4 Any semitrailer or full trailer manufactured on or after March 1, 1979, shall be equipped with rear side-marker lamps at a height of not less than 381 mm (15 inches), and on the rear of trailers not more than 1,524 mm (60 inches) above the road surface, as measured from the center of the lamp on the vehicle at curb weight.

Footnote - 5 Each converter dolly, when towed singly by another vehicle and not as part of a full trailer, shall be equipped with one stop lamp, one tail lamp, and two reflectors (one on each side of the vertical centerline, as far apart as practicable) on the rear. Each converter dolly shall be equipped with rear turn signals and vehicular hazard warning signal flasher lamps when towed singly by another vehicle and not as part of a full trailer, if the converter dolly obscures the turn signals at the rear of the towing vehicle.

Footnote - 6 Pole trailers shall be equipped with two reflex reflectors on the rear, one on each side of the vertical centerline as far apart as practicable, to indicate the extreme width of the trailer.

Footnote - 7 Pole trailers, when towed by motor vehicles with rear identification lamps meeting the requirements of § 393.11 and mounted at a height greater than the load being transported on the pole trailer, are not required to have rear identification lamps.

Footnote - 8 Pole trailers shall have on the rearmost support for the load: (1) two front clearance lamps, one on each side of the vehicle, both on the same level and as high as practicable to indicate the overall width of the pole trailer (2) two rear clearance lamps, one on each side of the vehicle, both on the same level and as high as practicable to indicate the overall width of the pole trailer (3) two rear side marker lamps, one on each side of the vehicle, both on the same level, not less than 375 mm (15 inches) above the road surface (4) two rear reflex reflectors, one on each side, both on the same level, not less than 375 mm (15 inches) above the road surface to indicate maximum width of the pole trailer and (5) one red reflector on each side of the rearmost support for the load. Lamps and reflectors may be combined as allowed in § 393.22.

Footnote - 9 Any motor vehicle transporting a load which extends more than 102 mm (4 inches) beyond the overall width of the motor vehicle shall be equipped with the following lamps in addition to other required lamps when operated during the hours when headlamps are required to be used.

(1) The foremost edge of that portion of the load which projects beyond the side of the vehicle shall be marked (at its outermost extremity) with an amber lamp visible from the front and side.

(2) The rearmost edge of that portion of the load which projects beyond the side of the vehicle shall be marked (at its outermost extremity) with a red lamp visible from the rear and side.

(3) If the projecting load does not measure more than 914 mm (3 feet) from front to rear, it shall be marked with an amber lamp visible from the front, both sides, and rear, except that if the projection is located at or near the rear it shall be marked by a red lamp visible from front, side, and rear.

Footnote - 10 Projections beyond rear of motor vehicles. Motor vehicles transporting loads which extend more than 1,219 mm (4 feet) beyond the rear of the motor vehicle, or which have tailboards or tailgates extending more than 1,219 mm (4 feet) beyond the body, shall have these projections marked as follows when the vehicle is operated during the hours when headlamps are required to be used:

(1) On each side of the projecting load, one red side marker lamp, visible from the side, located so as to indicate maximum overhang.

(2) On the rear of the projecting load, two red lamps, visible from the rear, one at each side and two red reflectors visible from the rear, one at each side, located so as to indicate maximum width.

Footnote - 11 To be illuminated when headlamps are illuminated. No rear license plate lamp is required on vehicles that do not display a rear license plate.

Footnote - 12 Every bus, truck, and truck tractor shall be equipped with a signaling system that, in addition to signaling turning movements, shall have a switch or combination of switches that will cause the two front turn signals and the two rear signals to flash simultaneously as a vehicular traffic signal warning, required by § 392.22(a). The system shall be capable of flashing simultaneously with the ignition of the vehicle on or off.

Footnote - 13 To be actuated upon application of service brakes.

Footnote - 14 Backup lamp required to operate when bus, truck, or truck tractor is in reverse.

(1) For the purposes of § 393.11, the term “overall width” refers to the nominal design dimension of the widest part of the vehicle, exclusive of the signal lamps, marker lamps, outside rearview mirrors, flexible fender extensions, and mud flaps.

(2) Clearance lamps may be mounted at a location other than on the front and rear if necessary to indicate the overall width of a vehicle, or for protection from damage during normal operation of the vehicle.

(3) On a trailer, the front clearance lamps may be mounted at a height below the extreme height if mounting at the extreme height results in the lamps failing to mark the overall width of the trailer.

(4) On a truck tractor, clearance lamps mounted on the cab may be located to indicate the width of the cab, rather than the width of the vehicle.

(5) When the rear identification lamps are mounted at the extreme height of a vehicle, rear clearance lamps are not required to be located as close as practicable to the top of the vehicle.

Footnote - 16 A trailer subject to this part that is less than 1829 mm (6 feet) in overall length, including the trailer tongue, need not be equipped with front side marker lamps and front side reflex reflectors.

Footnote - 17 A boat trailer subject to this part whose overall width is 2032 mm (80 inches) or more need not be equipped with both front and rear clearance lamps provided an amber (front) and red (rear) clearance lamp is located at or near the midpoint on each side so as to indicate its extreme width.


Formatting two adjacent footnote indicators in the body of the footnoted text [closed]

Want to improve this question? Update the question so it's on-topic for English Language & Usage Stack Exchange.

I've run into an issue using Microsoft Word 2013. In the following example, there is no way to know whether or not there exists one reference to footnote 12, or two references to footnotes 1 and 2:

This line of text is a footnote reference example. 12

It's an issue because I'm adding multiple footnotes to the same section of document body text in a "wiki" style document with multiple URL examples used as reference, for example:

The television character's name was Guy Characterburg. 1 2

¹ He was named Guy after Guy Fawkes. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guy_Fawkes

² And Characterburg because I am not very creative. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laziness

In that example, I've placed a space in-between the 1 and the 2 to make it easier to see. And at the end of an isolated sentence, a few extra spaces are certainly not the end of the world. But it adds a lot of awkward white space when done in the middle of a paragraph, for example:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec aliquam lectus eget rhoncus aliquet. Duis mollis, ligula quis dapibus mollis, magna velit aliquet mi, nec lacinia erat nulla nec dui. Nunc nec imperdiet 1 2 3 quam. 4 Aliquam iaculis 5 6 7 non tortor nec vestibulum. Curabitur accumsan bibendum tristique. Morbi ac felis massa. Donec eget mauris enim. Phasellus tristique 8 9 mauris ipsum, ac euismod felis sollicitudin vitae.

If I put a superscript comma in-between them, for example:

This is the last example, I promise 1,2 .

¹ This was a lie. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lie

² brutereason.net/2011/09/23/on-people-who-think-theyre-so-damn-funny

This confuses Microsoft Word, because its proofreading function ignores the footnote references and only sees:

This is the last example, I promise,.

..and puts squiggly red lines everywhere (well, in the dozen or so places it's an issue). If I try to add hard brackets, à la Wikipedia:

This also confuses Word. It thinks I'm bunching up parentheticals and uses squiggly blue lines to suggest spacing them out:

This [1] [2] is what Word would prefer.

That would be annoying to have to type in a bunch of superscript brackets and extra spaces, and it's not exactly aesthetically pleasing:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec aliquam lectus eget rhoncus aliquet. Duis mollis, ligula quis dapibus mollis, magna velit aliquet mi, nec lacinia erat nulla nec dui. Nunc nec imperdiet [1] [2] [3] quam. [4] Aliquam iaculis [5] [6] [7] non tortor nec vestibulum. Curabitur accumsan bibendum tristique. Morbi ac felis massa. Donec eget mauris enim. Phasellus tristique [8] [9] mauris ipsum, ac euismod felis sollicitudin vitae.

But I guess I'd take it if that was the official, last word on how to do it. So my question is, after all that, is this a situation that has a best practice? Is there a good way to get Microsoft Word to display adjacent footnote references?


11.2: Footnotes

* [1:1–4] On the epistolary form, see note on Rom 1:1–7. The apostolate is the divinely appointed mission to lead others to the true faith and through it to eternal salvation (Ti 1:1–3).

* [1:5–9] This instruction on the selection and appointment of presbyters, substantially identical with that in 1 Tm 3:1–7 on a bishop (see note there), was aimed at strengthening the authority of Titus by apostolic mandate cf. Ti 2:15. In Ti 1:5, 7 and Acts 20:17, 28, the terms episkopos and presbyteros (“bishop” and “presbyter”) refer to the same persons. Deacons are not mentioned in Titus. See also note on Phil 1:1.

* [1:10–16] This adverse criticism of the defects within the community is directed especially against certain Jewish Christians, who busy themselves with useless speculations over persons mentioned in the Old Testament, insist on the observance of Jewish ritual purity regulations, and thus upset whole families by teaching things they have no right to teach cf. Ti 3:9 1 Tm 1:3–10.

* [1:10] Jewish Christians : literally, “those of the circumcision.”

* [1:12] Cretans…gluttons : quoted from Epimenides, a Cretan poet of the sixth century B.C.

* [2:1–10] One of Titus’ main tasks in Crete is to become acquainted with the character of the Cretans and thereby learn to cope with its deficiencies (see Ti 1:12). The counsel is not only for Titus himself but for various classes of people with whom he must deal: older men and women (Ti 2:2–4), younger women and men (Ti 2:4–7), and slaves (Ti 2:9–10) cf. Eph 6:1–9 Col 3:18–4:1.

* [2:11–15] Underlying the admonitions for moral improvement in Ti 2:1–10 as the moving force is the constant appeal to God’s revelation of salvation in Christ, with its demand for transformation of life.

* [2:13] The blessed hope, the appearance : literally, “the blessed hope and appearance,” but the use of a single article in Greek strongly suggests an epexegetical, i.e., explanatory sense. Of the great God and of our savior Jesus Christ : another possible translation is “of our great God and savior Jesus Christ.”

* [3:1–8] The list of Christian duties continues from Ti 2:9–10, undergirded again as in Ti 2:11–13 by appeal to what God in Christ has done (Ti 2:4–7 cf. Ti 2:11–14). The spiritual renewal of the Cretans, signified in God’s merciful gift of baptism (Ti 3:4–7), should be reflected in their improved attitude toward civil authority and in their Christian relationship with all (Ti 3:1–3).

* [3:1] Magistrates and authorities : some interpreters understand these terms as referring to the principalities and powers of the heavenly hierarchy. To be open to every good enterprise : this implies being good citizens. It could also be translated “ready to do every sort of good work” (as Christians) cf. Ti 3:14.

* [3:8–11] In matters of good conduct and religious doctrine, Titus is to stand firm.

* [3:12–15] Artemas or Tychicus (2 Tm 4:12) is to replace Titus, who will join Paul in his winter sojourn at Nicopolis in Epirus, on the western coast of Greece.


Author: Jimmy Akin

Jimmy was born in Texas, grew up nominally Protestant, but at age 20 experienced a profound conversion to Christ. Planning on becoming a Protestant seminary professor, he started an intensive study of the Bible. But the more he immersed himself in Scripture the more he found to support the Catholic faith, and in 1992 he entered the Catholic Church. His conversion story, "A Triumph and a Tragedy," is published in Surprised by Truth. Besides being an author, Jimmy is the Senior Apologist at Catholic Answers, a contributing editor to Catholic Answers Magazine, and a weekly guest on "Catholic Answers Live." View all posts by Jimmy Akin


4. Decommissioning Strategy

The licensee shall select a decommissioning strategy that will form the basis for the planning for decommissioning and facilitate achieving the desired end state of the decommissioning project. For facilities and uranium mines and mills, the decommissioning strategy shall be selected early in the lifecycle of the facility.

The following decommissioning strategies should be considered individually or in combination:

  • immediate (prompt) decommissioning &ndash to decontaminate and dismantle without any planned delays
  • deferred decommissioning &ndash to place the facility in a period of storage with surveillance followed by decontamination and dismantlement, or to conduct activities directed at placing certain buildings or facilities in a safe, secure interim end state, followed by a period of storage with surveillance, and ultimately decontamination and dismantlement
  • in situ decommissioning &ndash to place the facility, or portions of the facility, in a safe and secure condition, in which some or all of the radioactive contaminants are disposed of in place, which may result in the creation of a waste disposal site

In such a case where the end state for in situ decommissioning results in a waste disposal site, the licensee shall satisfy all regulatory requirements for a radioactive waste disposal facility and demonstrate safety via a safety case and post-closure safety assessment of a disposal facility. Further information on safety case and safety assessment can be found in draft REGDOC-2.11.1, Waste Management, Volume III: Safety Case for Long-Term Radioactive Waste Management, Version 2 Footnote 3 . For waste with other hazardous properties, the licensee shall ensure that the safety case and supporting safety assessment encompasses those hazards and is in compliance with applicable regulatory requirements regarding such hazards.

In situ decommissioning with a disposal end-state is an accepted and acceptable practice for uranium mines and mills. Further requirements and guidance for waste management at uranium mines and mills are provided in REGDOC-2.11.1, Waste Management, Volume II: Management of Uranium Mine Waste Rock and Mill Tailings Footnote 4 . Additionally, in situ decommissioning may be considered a viable solution under exceptional circumstances (e.g., following a severe accident) or for legacy sites for which decommissioning was not planned as part of the design (e.g. in situations where the fuel has been removed and the use of in-situ will be protective of workers, public and the environment), and which will remain under institutional control for the foreseeable future. In order to align with international best practice, in situ decommissioning should not be considered a reasonable decommissioning option for situations where removal is practicable.

Note: In Canada, legacy sites specifically refer to research and demonstration facilities or facilities dating back to the birth of nuclear technologies in Canada for which decommissioning was not planned as part of the design.

The licensee shall justify the selected strategy and should conduct a comparison of alternative decommissioning strategies. The evaluation method used to select the decommissioning strategy should ensure that the relative advantages and disadvantages of the remaining strategies can be objectively compared in a systematic and traceable fashion.

When determining the appropriate decommissioning strategy, the licensee should consider the following, as appropriate:

  • public and Indigenous engagement
  • potential impacts on Indigenous and/or treaty rights
  • use of operational experience and lessons learned
  • forms and characteristics of radioactive and hazardous contamination
  • the integrity of containment and other structures, systems and components over time
  • the availability of decontamination and disassembly technologies
  • the potential for recycling or reuse of equipment and materials
  • the availability of knowledgeable staff
  • potential environmental impacts
  • potential worker and public radiological doses
  • end-state objectives and site redevelopment plans
  • potential revenues, costs and available funding
  • the availability of waste management facilities and disposal capacity
  • the availability of a fuel disposal facility if applicable
  • other political, social and economic considerations
  • interdependencies with other facilities or infrastructure located at the same site
  • assurance that the facility will be maintained in a safe configuration at all times
  • the principles of radiation protection, justification, optimization and application of dose limits

The decommissioning strategy should be reviewed and updated in light of:

  • changes in site conditions, or incidents and events with relevant consequences for decommissioning
  • changes to the proposed decommissioning objectives
  • changes to ownership or management structure
  • advances in decommissioning technology
  • significant modifications to the facility
  • updated schedule, cost and funding information
  • operational experience and lessons learned
  • revised regulatory requirements
  • availability of a facility for the management of irradiated fuel and radioactive waste

If shutdown of a facility is sudden, the decommissioning strategy shall be reviewed on the basis of the situation that initiated the sudden shutdown, in order to determine whether revision of the strategy is required.


11.2.1 By reason of illness, injury or quarantine

There must be a cause-and-effect relationship between the illness, injury or quarantine and the fact that a claimant is incapable of work Footnote 3 . It should also be understood that only an illness, injury or quarantine affecting the person who is making a claim for benefits is relevant here.

Pregnancy and childbirth are not, strictly speaking, an illness. This, however, does not necessarily mean that a woman who is pregnant or who has just given birth to a child cannot, in some circumstances, make a claim and receive benefits under the sickness benefits provisions Footnote 4 .

A physical or mental disability is not necessarily the equivalent of an inability to work Footnote 5 . Certain persons may prove that they are capable of work within the limits of their capacities, either because their handicap is not an obstacle to employment, because they were able to adjust to it on the basis of the labour market, or because they have the opportunity to work in a protected work environment.

Drug and alcohol dependency is without question another factor likely to render a person incapable of work during certain acute phases. It is possible that such a person will be treated in an outpatient clinic or will instead be admitted to a clinic, hospital or specialized centre for addiction treatment. Such a stay constitutes tangible proof that the person is not able to work, in which case the payment of sickness benefits will be considered, unless the admission is a condition of mandatory confinement which is occasionally imposed by courts of law in their sentences. Such mandatory confinement may be regarded as a stay in an institution similar to a prison Footnote 6 .


AGLC4 Referencing Guide

Footnotes should be used whenever information or ideas from sources are discussed. Sources such as legislation, cases, and secondary sources such as books, journals, reports, newspapers, interviews, radio, television and information from the internet must be acknowledged in text and detailed in your footnotes.

Footnotes are also used to provide extra information that is not appropriate to include in the body of the text.

They are used to back up an argument or to acknowledge a source that has contributed to an argument.

How can I create a Footnote?

To create a footnote in Word, click the 'References' tab in the toolbar, then click 'Insert Footnote'. See: Example

Your footnotes will be created in sequential numbers for the entire document.

  • In the text of your document, the footnote number always appears after punctuation, i.e. after a full stop or comma.
  • Always add a full stop at the end of each footnote citation.
  • A semicolon is used to separate multiple references in one footnote.

What is a pinpoint?

A 'pinpoint' refers to a specific page or paragraph to which a reference is being made. For example, you would cite a specific page in a book that you use as a source.

Pinpoint references should appear after the start page and be preceded by a comma and a space.

For more guidance, see rule 1.1.6.

What about using multiple sources?

When there are multiple citations in one footnote, the order of sources in the footnote should be in order of most relevant or important in context and this is a matter of judgment for the author. If such an ordering approach is not appropriate, then an ordering system that the author thinks is most appropriate for the context (e.g. alphabetically or chronologically).

A semicolon should be used to separate the sources, and the word 'and' should not be used to separate the last two sources.

For more guidance, see rule 1.1.3.

What about using the same source many times?

When a particular source is cited more than once in a paper, the full bibliographic details should not be provided each time in a footnote. The terms &lsquoibid&rsquo and &lsquon&rsquo are used to refer to previous citations.

For more guidance, see rule 1.4.

&lsquoIbid&rsquo is an abbreviation of the Latin term &lsquoibidem&rsquo, meaning &lsquoin the same place&rsquo. Use &lsquoibid&rsquo to refer to a source in the immediately preceding footnote, including any pinpoints. 'Ibid' should not be used where there are multiple sources in the preceding footnote.

&lsquoIbid&rsquo should always be capitalised when it appears at the start of a footnote. If there is a pinpoint reference, that is, a reference to a specific place in the cited text, and the next footnote is to the same work and to the same place in the cited text, use &lsquoibid&rsquo. The pinpoint reference should not be repeated. If you refer to the same source as in the immediately preceding footnote but to a different page or section, use &lsquoibid&rsquo followed by the pinpoint reference, that is, the different page or section number.

Use &lsquon&rsquo to refer to a source that has been cited in a previous footnote other than the immediately preceding one. For cases and legislation, a short title may be used followed by a cross-reference (n) in parentheses.

See the examples of repeat citations using &lsquoibid&rsquo and 'n' provided below.


1 Chronicles 11 New Living Translation (NLT)

11 Then all Israel gathered before David at Hebron and told him, “We are your own flesh and blood. 2 In the past, [a] even when Saul was king, you were the one who really led the forces of Israel. And the Lord your God told you, ‘You will be the shepherd of my people Israel. You will be the leader of my people Israel.’”

3 So there at Hebron, David made a covenant before the Lord with all the elders of Israel. And they anointed him king of Israel, just as the Lord had promised through Samuel.

David Captures Jerusalem

4 Then David and all Israel went to Jerusalem (or Jebus, as it used to be called), where the Jebusites, the original inhabitants of the land, were living. 5 The people of Jebus taunted David, saying, “You’ll never get in here!” But David captured the fortress of Zion, which is now called the City of David.

6 David had said to his troops, “Whoever is first to attack the Jebusites will become the commander of my armies!” And Joab, the son of David’s sister Zeruiah, was first to attack, so he became the commander of David’s armies.

7 David made the fortress his home, and that is why it is called the City of David. 8 He extended the city from the supporting terraces [b] to the surrounding area, while Joab rebuilt the rest of Jerusalem. 9 And David became more and more powerful, because the Lord of Heaven’s Armies was with him.

David’s Mightiest Warriors

10 These are the leaders of David’s mighty warriors. Together with all Israel, they decided to make David their king, just as the Lord had promised concerning Israel.

11 Here is the record of David’s mightiest warriors: The first was Jashobeam the Hacmonite, who was leader of the Three—the mightiest warriors among David’s men. [c] He once used his spear to kill 300 enemy warriors in a single battle.

12 Next in rank among the Three was Eleazar son of Dodai, [d] a descendant of Ahoah. 13 He was with David when the Philistines gathered for battle at Pas-dammim and attacked the Israelites in a field full of barley. The Israelite army fled, 14 but Eleazar and David [e] held their ground in the middle of the field and beat back the Philistines. So the Lord saved them by giving them a great victory.

15 Once when David was at the rock near the cave of Adullam, the Philistine army was camped in the valley of Rephaim. The Three (who were among the Thirty—an elite group among David’s fighting men) went down to meet him there. 16 David was staying in the stronghold at the time, and a Philistine detachment had occupied the town of Bethlehem.

17 David remarked longingly to his men, “Oh, how I would love some of that good water from the well by the gate in Bethlehem.” 18 So the Three broke through the Philistine lines, drew some water from the well by the gate in Bethlehem, and brought it back to David. But David refused to drink it. Instead, he poured it out as an offering to the Lord . 19 “God forbid that I should drink this!” he exclaimed. “This water is as precious as the blood of these men [f] who risked their lives to bring it to me.” So David did not drink it. These are examples of the exploits of the Three.

David’s Thirty Mighty Men

20 Abishai, the brother of Joab, was the leader of the Thirty. [g] He once used his spear to kill 300 enemy warriors in a single battle. It was by such feats that he became as famous as the Three. 21 Abishai was the most famous of the Thirty and was their commander, though he was not one of the Three.

22 There was also Benaiah son of Jehoiada, a valiant warrior from Kabzeel. He did many heroic deeds, which included killing two champions [h] of Moab. Another time, on a snowy day, he chased a lion down into a pit and killed it. 23 Once, armed only with a club, he killed an Egyptian warrior who was 7 1⁄2 feet [i] tall and who was armed with a spear as thick as a weaver’s beam. Benaiah wrenched the spear from the Egyptian’s hand and killed him with it. 24 Deeds like these made Benaiah as famous as the three mightiest warriors. 25 He was more honored than the other members of the Thirty, though he was not one of the Three. And David made him captain of his bodyguard.

26 David’s mighty warriors also included:

Asahel, Joab’s brother
Elhanan son of Dodo from Bethlehem
27 Shammah from Harod [j]
Helez from Pelon
28 Ira son of Ikkesh from Tekoa
Abiezer from Anathoth
29 Sibbecai from Hushah
Zalmon [k] from Ahoah
30 Maharai from Netophah
Heled son of Baanah from Netophah
31 Ithai son of Ribai from Gibeah (in the land of Benjamin)
Benaiah from Pirathon
32 Hurai from near Nahale-gaash [l]
Abi-albon [m] from Arabah
33 Azmaveth from Bahurim [n]
Eliahba from Shaalbon
34 the sons of Jashen [o] from Gizon
Jonathan son of Shagee from Harar
35 Ahiam son of Sharar [p] from Harar
Eliphal son of Ur
36 Hepher from Mekerah
Ahijah from Pelon
37 Hezro from Carmel
Paarai [q] son of Ezbai
38 Joel, the brother of Nathan
Mibhar son of Hagri
39 Zelek from Ammon
Naharai from Beeroth, the armor bearer of Joab son of Zeruiah
40 Ira from Jattir
Gareb from Jattir
41 Uriah the Hittite
Zabad son of Ahlai
42 Adina son of Shiza, the Reubenite leader who had thirty men with him
43 Hanan son of Maacah
Joshaphat from Mithna
44 Uzzia from Ashtaroth
Shama and Jeiel, the sons of Hotham, from Aroer
45 Jediael son of Shimri
Joha, his brother, from Tiz
46 Eliel from Mahavah
Jeribai and Joshaviah, the sons of Elnaam
Ithmah from Moab
47 Eliel and Obed
Jaasiel from Zobah. [r]

Footnotes:

    Or For some time. Hebrew the millo. The meaning of the Hebrew is uncertain. As in some Greek manuscripts (see also 2 Sam 23:8) Hebrew reads leader of the Thirty, or leader of the captains. As in parallel text at 2 Sam 23:9 (see also 1 Chr 27:4) Hebrew reads Dodo, a variant spelling of Dodai. Hebrew they. Hebrew Shall I drink the lifeblood of these men? As in Syriac version Hebrew reads the Three also in 11:21. Or two sons of Ariel. Hebrew 5 cubits [2.3 meters]. As in parallel text at 2 Sam 23:25 Hebrew reads Shammoth from Haror. As in parallel text at 2 Sam 23:28 Hebrew reads Ilai. Or from the ravines of Gaash. As in parallel text at 2 Sam 23:31 Hebrew reads Abiel. As in parallel text at 2 Sam 23:31 Hebrew reads Baharum. As in parallel text at 2 Sam 23:32 Hebrew reads sons of Hashem. As in parallel text at 2 Sam 23:33 Hebrew reads son of Sacar. As in parallel text at 2 Sam 23:35 Hebrew reads Naarai. Or the Mezobaite.

Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright © 1996, 2004, 2015 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. All rights reserved.


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